Playbill Vault’s Today in Theatre History: June 26

1911 Ziegfeld Follies of 1911 opens at New York’s Jardin de Paris. Irving Berlin contributes songs including “Woodman, Woodman, Spare That Tree” and “You’ve Built a Fire Down in My Heart.”

1975 The first revival of Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman opens at Circle in the Square on Broadway, starring George C. Scott as tragic hero Willy Loman. The play, directed by Scott, also features Teresa Wright, Harvey Keitel, and James Farentino as the Loman family.

1991 The most recent revival of George Bernard Shaw‘s Getting Married opens at Broadway at Circle in the Square. Stephen Porter directs a cast that includes Elizabeth Franz, Patrick Tull, Simon Jones, Madeleine Potter, and Walter Bobbie. The production plays 70 performances before closing August 25.

2003 Will Power’s Flow—a co-production of New York Theatre Workshop and the New York City Hip Hop Theater Festival—opens at Performance Space 122. “A tale of seven storytellers,” the show features writer-performer Power portraying many characters using rap, rhyme, and movement. Power is accompanied live by DJ Reborn, with original music created by Power and Will Hammond.

2008 Cirque Dreams Jungle Fantasy, the family-friendly theatrical, acrobatic, and musical adventure that evokes the exotica of untamed places, opens at the Broadway Theatre for a ten week run.

2013 Tony Award-nominated composer Andrew Lippa stars as late gay rights pioneer Harvey Milk in his new oratorio I Am Harvey Milk, which receives its world with the San Francisco’s Gay Men’s Chorus. Tony Award winner Laura Benanti is also featured.

2014 The Lion, a new autobiographical solo musical written and performed by singer-songwriter Benjamin Scheuer, opens Off-Broadway at Manhattan Theatre Club, directed by Sean Williams.

2019 Halley Feiffer’s Moscow Moscow Moscow Moscow Moscow Moscow, a re-imaginging of Chekhov’s Three Sisters, opens at MCC Theater Off-Broadway.

Today’s Birthdays Kevin Adams (b. 1962). Joyce Ebert (1933–1997). Ariana Grande (b. 1993). Sean Hayes (b. 1970). Sidney Howard (1891–1939). Chris O’Donnell (b. 1970). Gedde Watanabe (b. 1955).