In the News: Remembering George Segal on Stage, Glee Cast to Honor Naya Rivera at GLAAD Awards, More

Read on for more theatre headlines you may have missed in today’s news.

Glee Stars Will Reunite for the GLAAD Media Awards
The virtual presentation of the 32nd Annual GLAAD Media Awards, streaming April 8, will feature a reunion of stars of the musical comedy series Glee. The appearance marks the tenth anniversary of the character Santana Lopez’s coming out on the series. The tribute will spotlight the character, played by the late Naya Rivera, including her impact on LGBTQIA+ teens and Latinx LGBTQIA+ representation on television. Demi Lovato, who played Santana’s girlfriend on the show, will introduce the special tribute featuring cast members Jacob Artist, Chris Colfer, Darren Criss, Vanessa Lengies, Jane Lynch, Kevin McHale, Heather Morris, Matthew Morrison, Alex Newell, Amber Riley, Harry Shum Jr., Becca Tobin, and Jenna Ushkowitz. Neicy Nash hosts the ceremony, which will also include appearances from Broadway alums Jim Parsons, Matt Bomer, Colman Domingo, Anthony Rapp, and Robin de Jesús. For a link to watch and more, click here.

Black Feminist Video Game by Darrel Alejandro Holnes Gets World Premiere
The Civilians will present the digital world premiere of Black Feminist Video Game by Darrel Alejandro Holnes, former member of The Civilians’ R&D Group. The play, which was developed with the Group, centers on Jonas, a biracial teenager with autism, who broadcasts all aspects of his life online, including a disastrous first date with his crush. The cast includes Christon Andell, Kyla Jeanne Butts, Starr Kirkland, Darrel Alejandro Holnes, Constance Fields, Phillip Patrick Wright, Michael Diamond, Mia Anderson, and Brandiss LaShai Seward. The production is directed by Victoria Collado and features an original video game created by Ché Rose and Jocelyn Short of Cookout Games. Six live performances will stream April 27–May 2, with on-demand viewing available May 3–9. For complete schedule and ticketing, visit TheCivilians.org.

Bette Davis Ain’t for Sissies Set for Broadway On Demand
Jessica Sherr’s solo show Bette Davis Ain’t for Sissies will premiere on the theatre streaming platform Broadway On Demand at 8 PM ET March 26. Karen Carpenter (Love Loss and What I Wore) directs the production, written by and starring Sherr as Hollywood legend Bette Davis. The play is set in 1940, on the evening that 31-year-old Bette Davis returns home early from the 1939 Oscars, knowing that she’s lost the Best Actress Award to Vivien Leigh’s Scarlett O’Hara (the L.A. Times had leaked the winners prior to the ceremony). The show has previously toured internationally after a successful debut at The Edinburgh Fringe Festival, and had a four-week Chicago run in 2017. It will be available through April 26 on BroadwayOnDemand.com.

Remembering George Segal
Actor George Segal, whose credits range from his Oscar-nominated turn as Nick in Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? to his most recent eight-season run as Pops in the ABC sitcom The Goldbergs, died March 23 at the age of 87. Segal’s decades-long career began in New York as a student at the Actors Studio. He had a few odd jobs and an eventual small role in The Iceman Cometh at Off-Broadway’s Circle in the Square (located then at 5 Sheridan Square) in 1956 before being drafted to the Army. Upon his return to civilian life, he had some small film roles and appeared on Broadway in 1961’s Gideon and 1963’s Rattle of a Simple Man before his co-starring role in the 1966 Burton-Taylor film of Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? that kept him working in Hollywood for the next several decades. He did pop back to Broadway twice over the years: once in the short-lived Requiem for a Heavyweight in 1985, and again in 1999 as a replacement in Art. Take a look at him below in a rehearsal shot from Rattle of a Simple Man, with stars Tammy Grimes and Edward Woodward.

George Segal, Tammy Grimes, and Edward Woodward in rehearsal for <i>Rattle of a Simple Man</i>“><figcaption> <span class= George Segal, Tammy Grimes, and Edward Woodward in rehearsal for Rattle of a Simple Man Friedman-Abeles/©NYPL for the Performing Arts